Triangle InfoSeCon and BSides RDU Close Out Cybersecurity Awareness Month in NC

The Research Triangle Park (RTP) located in the Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill area of North Carolina is home to number of tech companies and a growing cybersecurity community. This location closed out the October cybersecurity awareness month with a bang! Two conferences back to back with a goal to educate the community.

First, BSides RDU was held on October 19th at the historic Carolina Theatre in Durham and featured a fantastic line-up of speakers, hacker jeopardy, Capture the Flag (CTF), Lockpick Village, Vintage Tech Museum, and more.  This year, BSides RDU was able to make the event FREE to all attendees which undoubtably expanded the outreach to the community.  It was a special event that provided education for individuals from beginning to advanced cybersecurity skill levels.  The event was live streamed and all talks can be found on the BSides RDU YouTube channel.

Triangle InfoSeCon is the largest security conference in North Carolina with over 1,600 attendees.  The event was held on October 26th at the Raleigh Convention Center and is organized every year by the Raleigh ISSA Chapter.  It was an action-packed event with two keynotes and eight speaker tracks.  In addition to speakers, the event had a hacking tournament, lockpick village, and after-dark educational events.

These two wonderful conferences are going strong in a growing security community.  They have created a positive learning environment and are amazing educational events in North Carolina. Well done!

 

And that's what's good,

Jon

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Sports for social change: School's revolutionary curriculum helps at risk kids

At this new charter school the students play seasonal sports (as well as weight training, cardio, yoga and core strengthening) for the first three hours each day!  The goal of this very unique high school is to use sports as an academic-engagement tool to drag the highest of the high-risk students back from the precipice of scholastic failure.  The school week is six days long, and all students participate in a mandatory summer program.

Urban Dove Team Charter School in Bedford-Stuyvesant is open to students who are “over-age and under-credited.”  (In New York City, there are nearly 140,000 young people between the ages of 15-21 who have either dropped out of high school or are lacking the course credits necessary for graduation.)  This charter school has three special ed teachers and a social worker, but the critical role is played by the coaches.  Students are divided into “teams”, but their coaches also play the role of adult mentors who travel with the teams through every class during the entire school day, starting with a homework period (all “homework” is done in the morning with the team), and who motivate, guide, and counsel the students.  Coaches promote communication, teamwork, and leadership to help improve students’ confidence and self-esteem, ability to focus, managing of emotions, and consideration of others.

The school’s founder, Jai Nanda, coached basketball in an urban school in the 1990s and noticed that the boys on his team did much better academically during the basketball season and would often drop out completely when the season ended.  Jai began to understand the academic and social power of sports to energize, engage, and educate, which eventually led to this academically successful charter school which uses sports to provide a structured, disciplined environment.   Jai has worked with young people his entire life, and has dedicated his career to improving and enriching their lives.



Research has long shown the health and social benefits of physical activity for young people, but there are growing studies showing that students can better focus their attention and perform better on academic tests after exercise.  Especially morning sports increases kids’ school engagement and cuts way down on truancy.

 

Marty,

The Good World News

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Over 5,000 "Little Free Libraries" appear around the world

It's called the "Little Free Library" and the idea has spread rapidly over the last few years.  These are little boxes shaped like small houses that contain books that anyone can use. 

How does it work?  Anyone can walk up to these libraries and look through the books.  If you find a book that you like, take it and leave a book in exchange.  People love these libraries and the books change every day!

The "Little Free Library" was started by Todd Bol and Rick Brooks in 2009.  Since they created the first one, over 5,000 libraries have appeared around the world (see the map).  You can either create your own library or order one from their website.  These Little Free Libraries have created a sense of community and have encourage people to read!

 


And that's what's good,

Jon

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