Random Good News

Businessman Buys Out Entire Kmart Store & Donates It To Charity

When the local Kmart in Clark County, Kentucky announced it was closing, a local business man knew that he could do something good for the area.  

Rankin Paynter, an owner of a successful jewelry exchange business in Winchester asked a Kmart clerk what they did with all of the unsold merchandise.  The clerk stated that the merchandise goes to power buyers.  Rankin signed up to be a power buyer and purchased all $200,000 worth of merchandise in the store.

In an interview with LEX18 News, Rankin Paynter stated: "What I see is people coming in my store, needy people sell their stuff," said Paynter, who owns a jewelry exchange business in Winchester. "It's bad nowadays. I just told (the clerk) lets just give it away to charity."

Paynter donated all of the merchandise to the local Clark County Community Services.  Not only was this the largest single donation that the non-profit ever received, but Judy Crowe of Clark County Community Services also said that it is the first year that their organization will have enough clothes to provide all in need this winter.

Talk about Good News!!!

Peace & Love,

Jon

 

 

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A Mother's Love, Still Strong at 104

It's a deal that has worked throughout human history: Your parents take care of you when you are little and you return the favor when they are old.

But sometimes the usual arrangement is turned on its head.

Maria Garcia is 87 years old. After a rich and rewarding life, she is now suffering from dementia. The person she depends on more than anyone else in the world… is her mother.

Her mother, Rosario Schielzeth, turned 104 this week. Her daughter had to be reminded every few minutes who the birthday balloons were for. And Rosario didn't mind answering, every time.

"She has the patience of a saint," says Maria's son and Rosario's grandson, Albert Garcia.

Albert, 60, describes his mother's condition as "happy clammy dementia," because she is never angry or upset. But like anyone with Alzheimer's Disease, she can be trying, asking the same questions over and over.

"My grandmother has to live with her 24-7," Albert says. "Not once have I seen her roll her eyes or answer curtly."

Since Rosario gave birth to Maria in 1925, the two women have almost never lived apart. When Maria was starting her own family, she had her own home, but it was across the street. And most of her life, she and her mother have lived under the same roof.

These days, that roof is in Sarasota, Fla. Every morning, the two women sit down to a leisurely breakfast. Rosario reads the paper and tells her daughter what's going on in the world, to keep her mind sharp.

"I talk all the time to her," Rosario says. "That's the best thing for people in that situation. Talk all the time."

Rosario herself has no trouble with her memory, or with anything else. She needs a walker to get around, but she doesn't wear a hearing aid. She doesn't even need glasses after having cataract surgery a few years ago. Apart from vitamins, she takes only one pill a day, a mild blood-pressure medication.

When people ask what's kept her going all these years, she tells them she watches what she eats and stays away from doctors.

Rosario has been taking care of other people her whole life. When she was a girl, living in Costa Rica, it was her siblings. She was one of ten children, so the older ones had to pitch in. Then it was her own children, and then her grandchildren.

When Albert was a baby his musician father, whom he describes affectionately as "a Puerto Rican Clark Gable with a pencil moustache," ran off with a stewardess. His grandmother, living across the street, "did the wash for both houses, cooked for both households," so his mother could go to work.

Not that her whole life was self-sacrifice. She had a passion for travel and even though her husband didn't, she managed to see much of the world.

He earned enough as a cabinet maker to support the family, so she went to work as a seamstress to earn travel money. With her girlfriends she took off for Thailand, Venice, Rome, Switzerland….

These days her journeys are more proscribed: the movies, the mall, the beach for ice cream.

But she can still enjoy her other great passion: Bingo. She and her daughter play at least six rounds every night.

Carol Festari, a live-in caretaker for both women, also joins the games. She says Rosario wins nine times out of ten.

They play for candy, to Rosario's regret. "Imagine if we were playing for money," she tells them. "You'd both be broke."

Festari says the first thing Maria says when she wakes up and the last thing she says before she goes to bed is, "Where's my mother?"

Her mother is always there.

 

 

 

Kongshaug, Nils.  "A Mother's Love, Still Strong at 104". Yahoo, via ABC news. 14 June 2012. Web. 

View original article at yahoo.com:

http://news.yahoo.com/mothers-love-still-strong-104-215716487--abc-news-topstories.html

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Man Becomes Musical Genius After Head Injury

Six years ago a Denver, Colorado man hit his head hard after diving into the shallow end of a pool. Days later, he sat down at a piano and discovered he was a musical genius.

Derek Amato is one of just 30 “acquired savants” worldwide. Each discovered an inexplicable abilty that was unleashed after an incident.

Amato was 40 years old at the time of the accident.

“I remember the impact being really loud. It was like a bomb going off. And I knew I hit my head hard enough that I was hurt. I knew I was hurt badly,” he described in a Science Channel documentary.

He was taken to the hospital with a serious concussion, and suffered some memory loss and hearing loss.

A few days after the accident, Amato visited a friend who had a keyboard and felt inexplicably drawn to the instrument, he told TODAY on Thursday.

He sat down to play and beautiful, fully structured, original music flowed from his hands. He played until 2 a.m.

“As I shut my eyes, I found these black and white structures moving from left to right, which in fact would represent in my mind, a fluid and continuous stream of musical notation,” Amato said in a blog post on the Wisconsin Medical Society website.

“I could not only play and compose, but I would later discover that I could recall a prior played piece of music as if it had been etched in my minds eye.”

Though he had dabbled in the guitar before, he’d never touched a piano, Amato told TODAY.

Rare cases like this open up a whole new realm of scientific exploration, as scientists investigate how this can happen. The big question is: do we all have this superhuman ability built in, if we could just tap into it and release it?

Wisconsin psychiatrist Darold Treffert, who researches savants, told the Atlantic Magazine he believes that after a trauma, other regions of the brain step in to compensate for the loss of function, which rewires the brain in ways we can’t imagine.

Scientists have a few cases to study as they explore the question, the magazine reported.

Orlando Serrell was hit in the head with a basketball at age 10 and discovered he could remember the weather for each day after his accident. Alonzo Clemens suffered brain damage after a head injury at age three, but can create incredibly detailed sculptures of animals in just minutes.

Amato told TODAY that though he still gets painful migraines and has lost 35% of his hearing, it’s well worth it.

Amato left his corporate job and became a professional musician. He’s released one album of original compositions and is working on another.

 

 

 

Neal, Meghan. "Suffers head injury, becomes musical prodigy" NY Daily News. 7 June 2012. Web.

View original article at nydailynews.com:

http://articles.nydailynews.com/2012-06-07/news/32106941_1_head-injury-brain-damage-original-music

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Houston Waiter Receives $5,000 Tip On $26 Bill After Losing Car

Luckily there are some tippers out there so generous that we momentarily forget about out all the bad ones. One Houston waiter learned that firsthand this Memorial Day weekend when he received a $5,000 tip on a $26 bill -- that's a 19,000 percent tip.

 

The generous gratuity was left Saturday by a couple dining at D’Amico’s Italian Market Café in Houston, according to the blog 29-95. The couple were regulars at the restaurant and were often served by Greg Rubar, a waiter there for the past 16 years.

 

When the couple learned the Rubar's car had been ruined recently by thunderstorms, they were understandably concerned. According to the Houston Examiner, Rubar, who is married with a small child, had struggled with transportation ever since his car was destroyed and had been lately borrowing vehicles from coworkers and taking taxis.

 

To relieve Rubar of his transportation burdens, the couple left a $5,000 tip on their next bill -- which totaled just $26.95 -- and told Rubar to "go buy himself a car."

 

"The couple, who do not want to be identified, thought anyone who has worked as hard and as proficiently as Rubar has for so long, shouldn’t be punished for something so out of his control," D'Amico's Italian Market Café said in a press release. "They had gone to the restaurant that night to present him with the money."

 

HoustonPress reported that Rubar burst into tears upon receiving the money. He is now shopping around for a new ride.

 

 

"Greg Rubar, Houston Waiter, Receives $5,000 Tip On $26 Bill After Losing Car". Huffington Post. 29 May 2012. Web. 

View original article at huffingtonpost.com:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/29/greg-rubar-houston-waiter-huge-tip-bill_n_1554118.html

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Girl Scout sends cookies to soldiers overseas

Thanks to one Rosemount second grader, Girl Scout cookie season made it to Afghanistan this year.

Bella Johnson, a student at Shannon Park Elementary School, was in the middle of selling cookies earlier this year when she decided she wanted to do something to help other people. She wasn’t sure exactly what she wanted to do at first. She just knew she wanted to help.

“I thought for a couple of days and I decided I wanted to help soldiers, because we were talking about how hard it was over there,” Johnson said.

Tim Roberts, a former neighbor and friend of the family, has served three tours as a member of the Air Force’s Flying Vikings. Johnson’s own father served eight years in the Army.

“He tells me stories about how bad it was,” Johnson said. “He said the worst thing was the spiders and the snakes.”

As she made her rounds, Johnson asked people if they wanted to buy an additional box of cookies to send overseas. Very few people turned her down, and a few who didn’t want cookies for themselves bought a box to donate. By the time she was done, she had gotten about 450 boxes donated. The Girl Scouts added another 400, and when Roberts made a trip back to Minnesota carrying wounded soldiers, she sent the cookies with him for the return trip.

Johnson had done community service projects before through Girl Scouts, but never anything quite like this.

“I was older. I thought I was more capable of doing something bigger than I could when I was a Daisy Girl Scout,” Johnson said.

Johnson got to see the fruits of her efforts two weeks ago when Roberts’ wife delivered a package of her own. In a binder, Johnson now has letters from Roberts and from a medical director who has been handing the cookies out to wounded soldiers. Both thanked her for thinking of the soldiers. She also got patches from their uniforms and a camouflaged tube of lip balm. Johnson received the delivery at school.

The delivery, like the project that inspired it, was well received. It might even have inspired more good deeds.

“I was kind of really proud,” Johnson said. “I told a lot of my friends about it. They said they want to do something as good as I did.”

 

 

Hansen, Nathan. "A good deed done with good taste". The Rosemount Town Pages. 2 June 2012. Web. 

View original article at rosemounttownpages.com:

http://www.rosemounttownpages.com/event/article/id/30503/

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There is Good News in the World

There definitely is good news in the world.  Many people watch the television and see so much negativity.  It really makes me want to turn off the TV.  There really should be a balance and that is why we have The Good World News.  With all of the negative news out there it really makes me wonder if the large media studios really believe that negative news attracts more viewers.  I do not believe that is the case.  Good news attracts just as much attention and it feels better :).  Send us your good stories and we'll post them!  There are so many wonderful stories, people, restaurants, and places.  They all deserve to be talked about!  Welcome to The Good World News.

 

Peace and Love,

Jon

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Ithaca Mayor Gives Up Car to Walk to Work

After Svante Myrick, 25, became the youngest-ever mayor of Ithaca, N.Y., he gave up his car to join the estimated 15 percent of his city’s residents who walk to work. As mayor, however, Myrick has a prime downtown parking spot reserved for his exclusive use. So instead of letting it stand empty, last week he began to, as he put it, “turn the Mayor’s parking space into a park space.”

Myrick hasn’t given up driving entirely; he belongs to the local Ithaca Carshare and told the Ithaca Times, “I love driving … I miss my car.” But he’s also working to enhance Ithaca’s transportation options. On his campaign website, he wrote, “The answer to too many cars is not necessarily more parking spaces … We can change traffic patterns and parking behaviors by providing alternative methods of transportation which are more affordable, reliable and convenient.” This guy is officially our favorite prodigy mayor since Ben Wyatt.

 

 

Laskow, Sarah.  "Ithaca mayor turns his personal parking space into a mini-park". Grist. 30 May 2012. Web. 

View original article at grist.org:

http://grist.org/list/ithaca-mayor-turns-his-personal-parking-space-into-a-mini-park/

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Boy with cerebral palsy runs most inspiring field-day race ever

 You can't keep a good man down -- especially not Matt W., who just single-handedly made us vow to never say we're too tired for the gym again. The determined student, who has spastic cerebral palsy, was given the option to sit out field day at Worthington, Ohio's Colonial Hills Elementary School, but he chose to run in an event instead, despite the challenges of his severe disability. Matt starts to slow down about halfway through his own personal mini-marathon, but he pushes on as his supportive classmates and gym teacher cheer "Let's go, Matt, let's go!" and run right behind him until the end of his two laps. Have you seen anything more inspiring this week? Nope, didn't think so.

 

{youtube}http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o6Alt2DssYc{/youtube} 

 

"Boy with disability runs most inspiring field-day race ever". MSN. 30 May 2012. Web. 

View original article at now.msn.com:

http://now.msn.com/living/0530-boy-cerebral-palsy-race.aspx

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Alaskans find Japanese teen's soccerball washed in after tsunami

RETRIEVING a lost soccerball is standard fare for many teenagers, but one Japanese schoolboy is getting his ball back all the way from Alaska, where it drifted following last year's tsunami.

Misaki Murakami, 16, lost his house and all its contents when the massive waves of last March crushed his hometown of Rikuzentakata in Japan's northeast.

But now, thanks to an observant beachcomber in the Gulf of Alaska, he is set to have his football returned to him, identified by the "good luck" messages scrawled on it by former schoolmates.

"I'm very grateful as I've so far found nothing that I'd owned," the youngster told broadcaster TBS.

The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said the observant beachcomber, identified as 51-year-old David Baxter, had spotted the ball on a beach on Middleton Island.

"A school name is stenciled on the soccer ball, and his (Japanese) wife was able to translate the writing to trace it to a school," the agency said.

 

"This may be one of the first opportunities since the March 2011 tsunami that a remnant washed away from Japan has been identified and could actually be returned to its previous owner," NOAA added.

Earlier this year the US coastguard scuttled a 65-metre (210-foot) fishing boat that had slipped its moorings in the tsunami and was spotted floating off the North American coast.

 

 

AP. "Alaskans find Japanese teen's soccerball washed in after tsunami". The Australian. 23 April 2012. Web. 

View original article at theaustralian.com.au:

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/in-depth/japan-tsunami/alaskans-find-japanese-teens-soccerball-washed-in-after-tsunami/story-fn84naht-1226336277886

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Carpenter builds incredible secret tree house on public land

It took months to find the right tree to build on, and when he did the spot was on public land looking down on a row of multi-million dollar homes.

But that didn't stop Joel Allen - he just built this incredible egg-shaped treehouse in Canada anyway, without telling anyone.

The computer technician-turned-carpenter started off by creating a scale model of his design to test its strength and durability, before beginning the months-long quest to find the perfect tree.

 

Joel Allen has built this incredible treehouse in Hemlocks, Whistler, western Canada

Joel Allen has built this incredible treehouse in Hemlocks, Whistler, western Canada

 
Joel took years to construct the treehouse. At this point he was working on the base

Joel took years to construct the treehouse. At this point he was working on the base

Without the money to buy property, he decided to do it on Crown land in the forests of Whistler.

'Finding that perfect spot on Crown land wasn't so easy,' he said. 'I had an informal checklist of requirements, the most important ones being that it within a reasonable distance to a road, yet out of sight and out of earshot of human traffic.

 

 
 

 

'The other requirement was hard to qualify, but was of prime importance: the shape of the egg would need to suit the environment and be proportionate to the tree. I couldn't explain exactly what that was but I figured I would know it when I saw it.'

Mr Allen found it in a patch of old growth near a development of multi-million dollar homes, then began secretly constructing it. The process took years, thousands of dollars, and many free items found on Craigslist.

Finally, he created the HemLoft.

 
Without the money to buy property, Joel decided to do it on Crown land in the forests of Whistler

Without the money to buy property, Joel decided to do it on Crown land in the forests of Whistler

 
 
 

Mr Allen found the perfect spot in a patch of old growth near a development of multi-million dollar home

 

 
Hidden: The treehouse in Hemlocks was built in a forest away from view of nearby homes

Hidden: The treehouse in Hemlocks was built in a forest away from view of nearby homes

 

 
Admiring the view: Joel Allen in the treehouse he built using items from Craigslist

Admiring the view: Joel Allen in the treehouse he built using items from Craigslist

 

Asked by a friend why he did it, Mr Allen said: 'I found myself grasping for some sort of rationalisation that would make me seem less crazy.

'She said "no, why did you really build it?" For the first time in my life, I was forced to face the truth about it. I said "I guess… I just wanted to build something cool".'

'Since the treehouse was built on crown land, I don't technically own it, and so its fate is uncertain.

 
Joel said: 'The shape of the egg would need to suit the environment and be proportionate to the tree. I couldn't explain exactly what that was but I figured I would know it when I saw it.'

Joel said: 'The shape of the egg would need to suit the environment and be proportionate to the tree. I couldn't explain exactly what that was but I figured I would know it when I saw it.'

 
The computer technician-turned-carpenter started off by creating a scale model of his design

The computer technician-turned-carpenter started off by creating a scale model of his design

 

 
It took Joel months to find the right tree to build on before he settled on the spot

It took Joel months to find the right tree to build on before he settled on the spot

 

 
The perfect egg-shaped treehouse was built on a tree over a slope on the mountain

The perfect egg-shaped treehouse was built on a tree over a slope on the mountain

For three years I kept the HemLoft secret, but now that I'm finished, I've found myself wanting to share it…Coming out of the bush about the HemLoft is fun, however it poses a few problems; if people know about it, they might try to find it. And if the wrong people find it, they may make me take it down.

'It took a lot of work to build it, and I'd rather not take it down, just yet. So I've been thinking of ways to expose the HemLoft, while somehow making it legal.

'To the best of my knowledge, Squatting on Whistler Mountain, beneath some of Western Canada's most luxurious mega-homes would not be looked favourably upon.'

 
 
Joel Allen said: 'It took a lot of work to build it, and I'd rather not take it down, just yet.'
Joel Allen said: 'It took a lot of work to build it, and I'd rather not take it down, just yet.'
 

Joel Allen said: 'It took a lot of work to build it, and I'd rather not take it down, just yet.'

 

 
Joel Allen's construction was conducted in secret until he finally went public

Joel Allen's construction was conducted in secret until he finally went public

{youtube}http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ONLyd2gmV8{/youtube} 

 

 

 

Watson, Leon. "'Squatter' secretly builds incredible (but thoroughly illegal) treehouse hidden in Canada's Whistler forest just yards from multi-million homes". DailyMail.co.uk. 23 April 2012. Web. 

View original article at dailymail.co.uk:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2133977/Carpenter-builds-incredible-egg-shaped-treehouse-hidden-view-Crown-land-just-yards-multi-million-homes.html

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