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Hearing your name picked during the NBA Draft is what all basketball players dream of.  Seeing the commissioner at the podium reading your name is a moment that you can truly cherish your entire life.  Although Isaiah Austin may never play basketball again, he had his shining moment during the 2014 NBA draft, and fulfilled his childhood dreams.  

During routine physicals for the NBA Draft, Doctors diagnosed Austin with Marfan syndrome, an inherited disorder that affects the ears, eyes, skeleton, and circulatory center.  This condition caused Austin to suddenly end his career in competitive basketball.    Before this discovery, Isaiah was a highly sought player coming off a great year at Baylor.  He was a sure 1st round pick in the draft.  

Thanks to a classy move by commissioner Adam Silver, Isaiah Austin was drafted by the NBA in the first round of the 2014 NBA Draft.  This truly shows that life is so much bigger than basketball, and you can’t take anything for granted.

"God has really blessed me," Austin told reporters after being drafted. "He could've allowed me to keep playing, but instead he saved my life."

He called getting his name called "one of the greatest moments of my life."  

 

 

Have a Great Day, and let the Good News be Yours.

Jeremy

 

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Crosstown rivals Simi Valley High (California) and Royal High featured a field-goal kicking competition during halftime of their game.  What’s the prize you ask…how about a brand new 2014 Chevrolet Camaro valued around $24,000! 

 

Former Simi Valley student Invictus Igwe may have had a leg up on his competition because he was a former placekicker himself, but a 40 yard field goal with the pressure of a brand new car isn’t exactly an easy task! 

 

 

With his shoe flying 10 yards down the field after he kicked it, the ball hits the upright and goes straight in!  Igwe is then tackled by the team, which I’m sure he didn’t mind after winning a sweet ride.

 

Igwe actually never drove the car off the lot, because they allowed him to trade in the car for a $20,000 cash prize, which he says he will use to pay off his personal debt. 

 

 

Have a great day, and let the good news be yours,

Jeremy

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One Down’s Syndrome man has overcome the odds to become a champion weightlifter. Not just in special Olympics competitions - Jon Stoklosa regularly beats the best of his non-disabled opponents!

When he was 12-years-old Jon started lifting weights in the basement with his brothers. A year later he was benching 185 pounds. By age 16, he had improved to 225 pounds.  He won a gold medal at the Special Olympics World Games in 1999, but now he competes in power lifting competitions going up against athletes who aren’t disabled.  With his sturdy 5-foot-5 frame, he can bench-press more than 400 pounds, and can squat 440 pounds and dead-lift an identical amount.

Not only are his competitors impressed, but he's also a crowd favorite, often inciting wild applause.  He has picked up a “Most Inspirational” award, a unanimous choice by other competitors, many of whom gathered to watch the 31-year-old make his lifts.  He’s been known to sport a colorful mohawk on the day of a competition. He loves to pound his chest after a successful lift.  He yells.  He flexes his muscles.  Except for when he’s lifting – and his face wears a look of concentration – he’s nothing but smiles.

When asked why he continues to push himself in his sport, Jon replied simply: “It’s fun.”  Sitting at the kitchen table in his family’s Newark home, Jon comes across as a laid-back, almost shy guy. He answers questions with a word, preferring instead to look out the backyard window and let his parents, Hank and Liz, do the talking.

When he’s not working out, Jon stays active at his job bagging groceries at the local Acme grocery store.  Friends and family say Jon Stoklosa, who was born with Down syndrome, is an example of what is possible when people aren’t tethered by labels.

 

Marty,

- The Good World News

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