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California’s Mr. Baseball for the year of 2010, Cory Hahn was destined to be in the Big Leagues, and to make an impact. After high school, Cory was drafted in the 26th round to the San Diego Padres, but turned that down to play college baseball at Arizona State.  

 

Just 3 games into in college career, Cory slid headfirst into 2nd base and collided with an opponent.  In a freak accident, Cory had broken his neck and doctors told him he was paralyzed from the chest down.  Cory knew his baseball career was over, but he held his head high and pursued a business degree while being the assistant coach for his team. 

 

Being that he was eligible for the MLB draft again because he was 3 years removed from high school, the Arizona Diamondbacks drafted him in the 34th round this past Saturday.  It was also significant because Cory had worn #34 at Arizona State.  Cory’s story is an inspiration to all, and we wanted to congratulate him on being drafted.  What an honor.

 

Have a great day, and let the good news be yours,

 

Jeremy

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During a high school track meet in Washington DC, some teammates noticed a familiar face on the other team.  They told their teammate that there was a girl on the opposite team that looked just like her! 
 
Jordan, a junior at Wilson High School went to the girl and introduced herself.  They quickly began chatting and discovered that their mother's both had the last name Jeter.  Turns out, Robin was 9 months older than Jordan who had been in the foster care system and ended up with a legal guardian. 
 
The two girls have been reunited and sharing lots of stories together.  They have many of the same features including their double jointed thumbs, the same shoe size, and can hardly tell the difference between the two on the phone.  Since they met, they have now became great friends, and are working together to find out if they have any more siblings.
 
 
Have a great day, and let the good news be yours,
 
Jeremy
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If you have ever watched someone pole vault before, you can obviously tell how scary and how hard it looks.  Now imagine doing it blindfolded...you would go nooooooo wayyyyy!  Well that is basically what Christian High School pole vaulter Aria Ottmueller goes through ever time she hits that track. 
 
Ottmueller was born without sight, later gained some vision, but his still considered legally blind.  At night, she can't see at all, she has no peripheral vision or depth perception and can't see facial expressions.  She would not let her condition get in the way of her doing what she always wanted to do. 
 
You may ask then how she actually does it!?  Aria carefully counted the steps it would take in her approach, and where exactly must plant her pole.  Her coach says she lands around 14-15 out of her attempts. 
 
Of course Aria didn't start pole vaulting for this amount of attention, but she just wanted to inspire people to never let anything get in your way of your goals.  Her dedication and hard work has paid off!  She vaulted 7 feet, 6 inches at the State Track meet at Mesa Community College! 
 
We wish you luck Aria in your future competitions!!!
 
 
 
Have a great day and let the good news be yours,
 
Jeremy
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