Good World News

A+ A A-

(China Grove, NC) - Ashley England was was having a rough dinner at Stag-N-Doe pizza with her 8 year old son.  Her son, Riley has epilepsy and is nonverbal.  He gets frustrated when he cannot speak and decided to throw a tantrum.

One stranger turned the England family's day completely around.  This stranger paid for their meal and attached a heartwarming note which read, "God only gives special children to special people."


Ashley was incredibly grateful. "To have someone do that small act towards us shows that some people absolutely understand what we are going through and how hard it is to face the public sometimes," she said. "They made me cry, blessed me more than they know. I felt like out of all the rude negative comments that we are faced with, these outweighs them. The people who care. Little did he know what struggles we had been facing lately, and this was surely needed at that moment."

Ashely posted her gratitude on Facebook: "Dear stranger, thank you for giving me a blessing tonight in a way you will never know."

 

And that's what's good,

Jon

Published in Random Good News

Nicholas Selby, a sophomore at Georgia Tech, gave incoming freshman a welcoming speech that they will never forget.  His speech amped up the crowd as the "2001: A Space Odyssey" theme music played in the background.  Nicholas received a well deserved standing ovation.  So go on and watch the video and amp yourself up for the week!!!!

And that's what's good,

Jon

Published in Random Good News

British artist Jeremy Deller teamed up with Michelle Huggins-Watts, Trinidad's “First Lady” of the steel pan, on a project to bring more young people into steel band music.  Their collaboration combined their very different skills to create a brand new, one-off performance and music event in Trinidad.

Jeremy Deller, speaking before the collaboration said: “For a long time I’ve been interested in steel bands. Trinidad is the home of steel bands so it makes sense to go to that place and see what you can come up with.”  Jeremy is a celebrated conceptual, video and installation artist, a hugely influential figure on the international contemporary art scene.

Michelle Huggins-Watts, speaking about the song they planned to use in the collaboration said: “It’s really different, not something you’d readily hear on the pan – I’m really looking forward to working on this piece!”  Michelle is the band leader and musical arranger of a champion Trinidadian steel pan band, she has toured the world, and is a music teacher at Trinity College where she runs a junior pan band.

 

Marty,

The Good World News

Published in Entertainment

Chicago Bulls build a playground

Chicago Bulls players and more than 200 volunteers got together in Chicago Heights on Saturday, August 24, to build a new playground, a playground designed by the children who will use it.

Children need a place to play every day in order to be active and healthy, but today’s kids spend less time playing outside than any previous generation in part because only 1-in-5 children live within walking distance of a park or playground. This play deficit is having profound consequences for kids physically, socially and cognitively.  This new playground will provide more than 500 children in the community with a safe place to play.

The Chicago Bulls have made a commitment to work with community concerns and find ways to make a positive impact on the lives of those in need, organizing events that support core values of youth education, health and wellness, and violence prevention.

 

Marty,

The Good World News

Published in Sports

When four football players from William Paterson University entered Buddy’s Small Lots general store, they did not know that it was closed.  The door was not locked and the lights were on. 

They were in search of sunglasses and batteries, but soon realized that no one was in the store.  What they did next surprised everyone.  The four college students found their items, then put their cash, including tax, on the counter.  Then they waved to the cameras and walked out!

When Marci Lederman, the store manager, came in, she was amazed at their honesty.  So amazed, that she found out who the honest individuals were and gave them each $50 store credit!

“They could have ransacked the store. They could have really done anything,” Marci Lederman said. “They were perfect gentlemen.”



And that's what's good,

Jon

Published in Random Good News

Therapy llamas bring smiles to patients

Ever feeling blue and think, "God, I wish I could hug a llama right about now"? Well you can! Therapy llamas and alpacas are being used all across the country to buoy the spirits of the elderly and ill, bringing their fuzzy adorableness right to your door for some therapeutic TLC (that’d be Tender Llama Care).


 

Marty,

The Good World News

Published in Random Good News

The photo really says it all!

Jesse and Kelly Cottle, of San Diego, Calif., may look like any cute couple in love, but taking a closer look, one sees that Jesse, a marine and double-amputee, is being given a piggyback ride. Jesse, 28, lost both of his legs in Afghanistan in 2009 after stepping on an IED.  After spending months recovering in the hospital, Jesse met his future wife Kelly, 24, in San Diego at a swim meet during one of his first outings with his new prosthetic legs. “His personality and who he is just outweighs his injuries by so much that you forget about it after a while,” Kelly explained.

Jesse is not a hero for stepping on an IED, he’s a hero because of the way he has handled what was handed to him and how he chooses to continue to conduct his life with his positive attitude. The happy couple just celebrated their first wedding anniversary on Aug. 18 by eating the top layer of their red velvet wedding cake.

 

Marty,

The Good World News

Published in Lifestyle

Paralyzed stray dog gets second chance

The chances of a dog found on the streets ending up in a stable, happy forever home are, sadly, pretty slim. If you're a dog like Oscar, who, for reasons unknown, is paralyzed, those chances drop nearly to zero.

Oscar was staring at those odds when he was picked up by animal services in New York City, and, facing the cruel reality of adoption for special needs animals, he was placed on death row.  Then the little Dachshund mix was rescued, and not only rescued, but fit with wheels to overcome his handicap.  As the little pup demonstrates, a canine with special needs is still a rewarding companion.

 

Marty,

The Good World News

Published in Random Good News
It’s a long journey from a fun-loving pro-wrestler to a stay-at-home dad caring for a child who can’t talk or walk and depends on him around the clock.  Watching over his softly silent 7-year-old daughter, Steven Sharp calls her birth in 2006 both the greatest and the worst day of his life.

Brain damaged since arriving into the world, Samantha Grace Sharp was given two years to live, but that grim life sentence has come and gone -- and she is hanging on.  With his wife’s job providing health insurance, Steven has taken on the role of stay-at-home dad and nurse. He changes his daughter’s diapers, administers her medicine, feeds her and gives her stretches. 

Samantha can’t walk or talk – though she has some movement in her arms and legs – and is dependent on her parents’ care 24 hours a day. She’s basically an infant in the body of a 7 year-old, her mom noted.  Carlene, Steven’s wife, calls her husband's care amazing.  “It is truly a blessing that I have him because I don’t know many men… who would have hung around,” she said, adding she sees a strong bond between father and daughter. “Sam will always be daddy’s girl. Always and forever.”
 
Marty,
Good World News
Published in Random Good News

On most summer Saturdays, Nia Cardoze practices her forehand at the tennis courts outside Brooklyn's Marcy Houses, alongside other kids from the sprawling public housing complex. 
“I want to become the No. 1 player in the world,” said Cardoze, who is 10 years old. 

Cardoze is a member of the Kings County Tennis League, a nonprofit that provides coaching and tennis equipment to children living in four public housing projects in Brooklyn's Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood. Every Saturday, about 100 kids gather in small tennis courts or playgrounds alongside volunteer instructors.

Michael McCasland, a tennis standout in high school, moved to Bed-Stuy from Washington, D.C., in 2008 and noticed the gritty Marcy tennis courts, which were rarely used for tennis, he said. One Saturday, McCasland arrived at the courts with a bucket of tennis balls and an extra racket, and began offering free tennis lessons to the neighbors.

"Nobody showed interest," McCasland said. "It was weird to have these tennis courts and the people didn't want to play tennis."

McCasland was undeterred. He posted fliers at bodegas and walked the neighborhood offering to teach kids for free. He said he wanted to show his neighbors that tennis wasn't just a "white guy" game. After a month he had five students. By the summer's end he had 20.

McCasland developed a retention program for the next summer. Children who came to three practices could rent a racket for the week, free of charge. Five practices earned the kid a uniform. He also began mentoring his students, helping them learn vocabulary and develop life skills outside of tennis.

For three summers, McCasland ran his program on a shoestring, collecting used rackets from friends and holding informal fundraisers at bars. In 2011 he received an email from an official with the USTA's Eastern Section, which oversees tennis development in greater New York City.  The relationship with USTA led to the grant money, which has allowed McCasland to purchase rackets, print uniforms and expand into the other public housing complexes.

As McCasland puts it: “This project really has an impact. It builds a connection between tennis and the kids, the kids and their parents and parents to parents.  We get kids more active, and we also see behavioral changes.”

 

Marty,

Good World News

Published in Sports
Page 1 of 7
Good World News © 2013